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RSR Celebrates International Women’s Day

Millennials have received a bad wrap in the work force, frequently being called “lazy” or “entitled” by their older counterparts.

It’s no secret that women make the world go round. Here at RSR, we have a majority female office that stays afloat thanks to the dedication, intelligence and support of our female team members. On International Women’s Day, we wanted to celebrate all the empowering lady bosses in the world, by asking our RSR women what being a woman means to them, and our RSR guys why today is so important.

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“Celebrating International Women’s Day is important for me as it highlights that the struggle for women’s rights still has a long way to go. It helps to remind me that everyone is involved in creating equality in the workplace and making sure that we eradicate the conscious, unconscious and systematic biases that lead to inequality of opportunity.” – Gareth Price, Technical Director

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“For me being a woman means being capable of anything. We are the full package. I think since we’ve had to historically face so much adversity, it enables us, begs of us to even more be the most badass creatures on earth.” – Amanda Ford, Senior Art Director

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“Being a woman means being your own champion and a champion of all women. Having confidence in yourself, your ideas and your actions. Being a woman means relentlessly standing up to inequality and influencing those around you to do the same.” – Kitty Tsang, Digital Strategist

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“Being a woman means bringing things to life, pushing yourself and others harder everyday to break boundaries and achieve more than what is expected of you, supporting other women in their societally deemed ‘unattainable/impossible’ goals, and proving that you can to those who say you can’t.” – Siena Tan, Designer

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“Celebrating International Women’s Day important to me because ‘until we are all free, we are none of us free.’

I am no stranger to facing bigotry. Growing up an immigrant and a timid kid in a xenophobic and macho culture is enough life experience for me to write a book on the minority identity. In school, in order to fit in, I learned to accept my peers’ bullying as endearment, and overtime, the normalized verbal abuse fucked up my identity development and self-esteem. For a long time, I’ve connected my weaknesses, insecurities, and personality flaws to my non-macho attributes and my East Asian background. And this made me subconsciously believe that somehow being non-macho and non-Western lessens one’s humanity. And that sensitivity and empathy are weaknesses, because to be a winner is to be dominant, violent, and red-white-and-blue.

It wasn’t until I started to read about feminism that I began to notice these hidden toxic knots within myself. The women’s movement is important because its learnings shed light on identity issues often too deeply ingrained in an individuals’ psyche.” – Han-Chia Chen, Senior Product Designer

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“Being a woman means being a part of an incredibly strong global community.” – Anastasia Kuznetsova, Art Director

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“I grew up in a strong female household. My mom has always been the breadwinner and career-person, and my dad (self-employed) supported her ambitions unconditionally while taking care of domestic chores and generally keeping house.

To a great extent, I attribute my mom’s success to my dad. Without his advanced outlook on male/female roles, and his unwavering support — both moral and practical — of my mom’s goals, she likely wouldn’t have made it as far as she did in her career. Her field is mired in patriarchy, and even today women who make it to the highest ranks most often do so at the expense of their personal lives, and forgo marriage or family altogether.

But of course, for the most part, I attribute my mom’s success to my mom. She is an amazing, tenacious, fiercely intelligent and stubborn woman who knew what she wanted since she was a little girl, and went for it. She is also warm, thoughtful, caring, generous, and giving (almost to a fault). She balanced personal aspirations with professional ambition, and didn’t have to sacrifice one for the other. She was able to do it all.

Being a woman to me means being heir to that legacy. It means having the strength and courage to go after what you want, but never at the expense of others; being kind and giving, but not letting yourself be taken advantage of. It’s finding compromise without compromising. As a woman – as a person – my hope is to one day inspire someone the way my mom inspires me.” – Cristina Alberto, Production Director

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“Strength and independence. I had two amazing women role models growing up who were both single mothers (my mom and grandmother). They worked, took care of their children, and at times had to play the role of both parents. They always taught me that I am powerful and should never have to rely on a man, but rather, make something of myself by being my own person.” – Rachel Fernandez, Digital Marketing Specialist

To hear more from our inspiring team, check out our Instagram page here.

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