Developing a Brotherly Bond

By Cody Maurer

Not too long ago, the RSR Development team ventured from the streets of Soho toward the charming avenues of Williamsburg, Brooklyn, for a well-deserved afternoon retreat. Although the crew occasionally convenes for post-work drinks at a local LES bar, they were eager to relax and relate for the day in a new environment.

Coordinated by Technical Director Gareth Price, the team kicked things off with a long lunch at an authentic Brazilian Restaurant. Celebrating their completion of past projects over spicy cocktails, they also indulged in meats and various dishes idiosyncratic to this South American geographical hot spot.

Next, they headed to the Russian & Turkish Baths with high aims to de-stress and unwind. The technology industry can seem like an echo chamber at times, so they felt it was important to go beyond the traditional cliches of corporate retreats and find a shared experience that grew their connections to the New York City community they live in as well as to each other. “The Turkish & Russian Baths are a unique NYC cultural experience that’s been mostly unchanged for over 100 years — a great reminder that while technology changes daily, the things we create must be usable and enjoyable by the people and communities we are serving,” Price said.

Developer Dylan Gluck comedically added, “It was really cool, like walking into a late 1980s New York cinematic scene, where loads of Russian guys were there offering massages — which was actually kind of intimidating,”

Inside and outside of the workplace, the Dev guys are armed with more than out-of-this-world intelligence and unique skills to speak cryptic and coded languages. They also possess an inherent ability to understand and work effectively alongside the minds of the creative brand strategist. By transforming what was once just an idea into a viable and marketable object, they eloquently take the art of co-ed collaboration to an alternate paradigm on a daily basis.

For Price, “the most interesting aspect of working alongside creative is the fact that they are not constrained by technology, and I really admire this. As a developer, I am always looking at something and asking ‘how can it work?’ Where a creative mind will just envision what they want, and approach us asking how can WE make this work? I am constantly challenged by the creatives at RSR and can only hope they feel the same about our side.”

Daily challenges, tests and trials, which call for active support, participation and full ownership, there is never a dull day at RSR or even at an out-of-office bonding retreat.

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